René Penn

Writer. Aspiring author. Blogger. Follow me.


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Establishing a Daily Routine to Help My Writing

It’s time that I start working on a writing routine, because yesterday morning I spent about 90 minutes looking at YouTube videos from the Graham Norton Show. By the end of it, I had tears streaming down my face and an ab workout from laughing so much. Then, writer’s guilt slapped me in the face. The time on the clock set me straight, and I dove into my WIP. I managed to write 1,800 words, but it was a bit frazzling. I don’t want to repeat yesterday’s action of going down the Internet rabbit hole, so here’s the daily routine I want to establish for myself. nick-morrison-325805

Morning:

  • Check and engage in social media and blog

Since my instinct in the morning is to pick up my phone and start web-surfing, it may be better not to fight it. Here’s my chance to check my WordPress and Twitter stats, view other people’s posts and spend some time engaging with others. I also spend this time catching up on regular news.

  • Work on blog post

While I was working full-time, I was able to write one blog post per week. Now, I’m going to try to increase it to two, and see how that goes. I don’t want to overcommit myself, because if I don’t do it, writer’s guilt sets in. (I’m noticing a pattern about writer’s guilt. Definitely a future blog post idea.)

  • Spend time creating

I’m convinced that my novel writing is better and more focused when I have another creative outlet. That’s one of the reasons I started making jewelry a few years ago, blogging is, too. Novel writing, for me, has been a slog-through-the-mud experience that may or may not lead to a completed manuscript. When I make jewelry or work on my blog, it satisfies that need for an immediate sense of accomplishment. I don’t do this every day, but I’m aiming for twice a week.

  • Go to the “office”

I can work on my blog at home, no issues there. But when it’s time to push out hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of words, I need to be in a space where I’m less distracted—where no dishes, laundry, TV or nap-friendly couch are calling for my attention. My office is the library. The book stacks are inspiring. And I don’t have to feel obligated to buy a cup of tea, like I would at a cafe, when I really just need to park my bum for 4 hours and write.

  • Write

Yes, blogging is writing, but the bulk of my writing time is spent on my novel-in-progress. My goal is 1,800 words per day. If I can commit to that, I’ll feel like I’ve truly earned my imaginary paycheck that day. How did I come up with the 1,800 word count? If I’m working on an 80,000-word manuscript at a clip of 1,800 words per day between Monday – Friday, then it would take about 2 1/2 months to finish. Give myself a 2-week grace period for any below-average productivity, and that allows for a 3-month timeframe. I think that’s respectable.

Afternoon:

  • Exercise

I know, I know. Exercise isn’t part of the writing process, but it makes me more energetic, which makes me a better writer. When I commit to three days of exercise a week, I’m not as lethargic. Depending on the weather, I alternate between aerobics, yoga, dance (I have fun trying to follow dance-tutorial videos, and I fail, epically), walking, jogging, and biking.

  • Write some more

After lunch is when I usually hit my stride. freestocks-org-229658The morning cobwebs are gone. I’ve spent some time thinking about what I want to write that day, and I’ve gotten my distractions out of the way.

Evening:

  • Read a book and maybe write even more

It’s baseball playoff time, and my hubby is all about MLB on TV right now. Me? Not so much. At first, I wanted the remote-control time back. But now I use that game time to catch up on a book or do more writing or blog-post tweaking.

RELATED ARTICLE: Famous authors and their daily routines

For those of you with day jobs, I know what you’re thinking: This is not doable for my schedule. harry-sandhu-209807You’re right. I wasn’t able to do it that way, either. But there are pieces of it that may be applicable to your daily routine. Here’s what I did while I was working my “8-to-5.”

Mornings for day job routine:

  • Check social media and blog

I rode mass transit to work, so I spent my riding time scrolling through my phone. If you have to drive, then I would spend 15 minutes before leaving home or when you get to the office (shh, we won’t tell anyone).

  • Write

During the ride, I would pull out my laptop or notebook and write for 10 – 15 minutes. Again, if you have to put hands on a steering wheel, then take the time during your lunch break to write.

  • Wake up early

Even better, wake up earlier to spend time writing or engaging on social media before you go to work. I spent a year waking up 30 minutes earlier than normal to write, and that’s how I finished my first full manuscript.

Evenings for day job routine:

  • Cut TV time, write instead

If you have what I call passive TV time—where you’re watching TV, but it’s really watching you—then pull out your laptop or notebook for 15 minutes. You may surprise yourself how far you can go. Just 200 words during Wheel of Fortune will add up over time.

  • Exercise while watching TV

You could do some squats, jumping jacks, and jog-in-place movements for 15 minutes while watching TV, to incorporate exercise and get energized.

Travel for work? You could consider writing in the airport or station, on the plane or train, and during any layovers.

RELATED ARTICLE: 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature winner Kazuo Ishiguro describes his “Crash” routine while writing Remains of the Day

What’s your daily writing routine? Is it working? Or do you prefer not to have one?

 

Photos by Harry Sandhu, freestocks.org and Nick Morrison on Unsplash


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Yikes, I Just Signed Up for NANO

I just signed up for NANO. What have I done? *faints*

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Many writers know why those seemingly harmless initials can cue thoughts of fainting, cold sweats, and uncontrollable facial twitching—and that’s the reaction for those of us who haven’t even participated in NANO before.

If the term NANO is new to you, it’s a tender little nickname for National Novel Writing Month. But there’s nothing tender about it. When you participate, you’re signing up to write 50,000 words of a novel, preferably a new one, between November 1 and November 30. That equals 1,667 words per day, for you MathWriterMeticians out there. On Friday, I wrote about 1,900 words, and my brain felt like cottage cheese afterwards. How can I sustain that kind of output for a month straight?

Luckily, there are no NANO police officers who will ticket us for not exactly adhering to the rules. I was assured that fact by a couple of regional liaisons for NANO, who lead a writer’s group that I attended. I also learned:

  • It’s okay if I continue working on my novel-in-progress during NANO. I just need to have a clean slate for my NANO word count starting November 1. Example scenario: My novel may already be at 50,000 words on Day 1 of NANO. If I get to 52,000 at the end of the day, I should log in that I’ve written 2,000 words for NANO. But no matter what, you can’t include the word count of anything written before November 1. Editing doesn’t count, either.
  • There are resources available through NANO, like online forums and write-ins. A write-in is basically a meet-up where folks get together to work on their NANO projects. Oh, and you’re allowed to talk while you’re there, too.
  • There are cute badges and certifications if you make the 50,000-word goal.
  • Even if you don’t hit 50,000 words, there’s a sense of accomplishment no matter what. The odds are high that you’ve written more by the end of November than you did in October or September, and so on.

So who else has signed up? What pointers do you have for me to survive the month of November?

 

 


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Jewelry: Summer in Fall

The high temperatures have been in the 80s in the Washington, DC area. The weather has inspired the name for this necklace that I created. I’m calling it, “Summer in Fall.”

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I love how the bright colors in the photo contrast with the earth tones behind it.

Here are some of the pieces that I used to make it—the “before” of the “before and after.”

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What things make you think of summertime in the fall?

 


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How Do I Update My LinkedIn Profile to Show that I’m Working on a Novel Full-Time?

The last day at my 8-to-5 job was Friday, so yesterday I decided to update my resume on LinkedIn. (Can you tell I’m excited for this new phase in my life?) I clicked on the “Add new position” link, which took me to a drop-down menu. I froze at that point, because I wasn’t sure what title to write. I immediately thought of late-night TV icon Jimmy Fallon, whose self-description on Twitter reads “astrophysicist.” Could I go there with my profile? Uh, no. Funny idea for Jimmy on Twitter, bad idea for me on LinkedIn.

So what exactly is my new position? I’m working on a novel, but I certainly can’t call myself a “Novelist.” I’ve always considered a novelist to be someone who has crossed the publishing threshold. I view the title “Author” the same way. Though I did read a compelling case for why you should call yourself a novelist, regardless.

Needless to say, I typed “Writer” as my new position. After that, it provided autofilled options, like “Freelance Writer” or “Independent Writer.” 20171003_091549Nah, those didn’t seem quite right, either. They imply that I’m a contractor or freelancer, which isn’t the case. The next thing to complete was “Company.” I was at a loss there, too. I decided to go with “Self-Employed.” That could also be slightly misleading, but it was the best fit among the choices offered. Plus, LinkedIn wouldn’t let me save the entry until the “Company” field was completed.

Last but not least was the description. “Writing and blogging” was what I wrote. It looked pretty skimpy compared to my previous 8-to-5 position, which was chock-full of communications-manager goodness. After some noodling, here’s what I decided to go with:

Writer and Blogger

  • Writing a fiction novel, currently a work-in-progress with 42,000 words written
  • Writing weekly blog posts and managing the website, using the WordPress platform, for renepenn.wordpress.com
  • Writing a romantic comedy screenplay, currently a work-in-progress with 45 pages written

I specified word and page counts to make the concept of fiction and screenwriting, which can be somewhat mysterious to non-writers, more tangible with hard-and-fast numbers. The blog and WordPress mentions indicate commitment to a weekly deadline and knowledge of a commonly used, widely respected website platform. I added my blog website for proof—plus, a little plug and cross-promotion never hurts.

Updating my LinkedIn profile was an important step. It shows that I’m no longer treating my writing as a hobby. It’s now a career path that I’m taking as seriously as any of my previous jobs. Any other ideas on how I can jazz up my profile even more? How have you updated your LinkedIn profile to reflect your writing?


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I Quit My Job to Work on My Novel

I turned in my resignation to pursue a dream. My dream is—and has been for years—to be able to make a living by writing novels, to sustain myself, financially, from doing something I enjoy. I never thought that it would be necessary to quit my job. I could surely cobble together enough writing time while working my 8-to-5, to get closer to my dream. It seemed doable. It seemed simple enough. But it hasn’t been.20170929_104626

Throughout my career, my dream has hung over me, shadowing my decisions. It led me into a career in ad writing, marketing and communications. Writing and editing have been the bedrock of most of my jobs. No coincidence there. It’s not that I haven’t enjoyed it or found it dissatisfying. I’m certainly proud of what I do at work. It just hasn’t been enough. Now that my last week at work has come to a close, it’s all so clear. All of these years, I was trying to fill a void that no job could fulfill.

During my mass-transit commute, mornings, evenings, and weekends, I’ve spent time working on fiction or screenwriting. I’ve had quite a few start-stop projects. Too many to count. But there was a turning point, when I wrote and helped produce a 12-episode web series in 2008–all while continuing my regular job. It was a body of “published” work, and it had a small group of very loyal followers. The opportunity raised my confidence about my writing abilities beyond the corporate brochures and internal communications that I cranked out for corporate America. But nothing happened after that. I wasn’t expecting a writing team at HBO to stumble upon the web series and say, “Her! We want her. No, we need her!” Though, that sure would’ve been nice. So I kept writing.

I finished a novel manuscript a few years ago. I woke up 30 minutes before work every day for over a year to write it. The finished product was decent, but definitely not great. 1506797324537-314911186-e1506797447273.jpg
I knew it needed work before I could shop it around to literary agents. I sent it to a freelance editor who gave me great advice. Most of all, I was happy to learn how much she genuinely liked reading the story. I worked on the rewriting process. I surprised myself by doing a genre switch, converting it from a novel format to a romantic comedy screenplay. I got halfway through, and then I started working on a historical romance novel, my current work-in-progress.

Sometime during the three years between the rom-com rewrite and the beginning of the historical romance manuscript, I met a great guy and got married. With his support, it was easier to make the decision to quit my full-time job and work on my novel. It wasn’t easy putting in my notice at work. A mind-shift had to occur before handing in the resignation. I’d been doing the same thing for so long—focusing on my job and treating my writing as a hobby—that I had to reprogram my thinking.

I had to think back to how I felt years ago when I took the job. This is going to be my last job, I had told myself, because I want my writing to take off. I’m going to work on my hobby until it becomes my next “job.” I put in a lot of hours, a whole lot of time, but I never reached my main goal. I finally realized that it was time to take the full leap of faith—no more of this part-time, on-the-side, hobby stuff. I needed to go all-in. Because my dream deserves this chance. Because sometimes you have to quit something to raise your chance of success.


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9 Historical-Romance-Inspired Items (Not) to Wear to Your Next Staff Meeting

What would happen if you wore a regency-era accessory or piece of clothing in today’s workplace? It would make things more interesting, wouldn’t it? You would be the talk of your team, department, floor, or heck, maybe even the whole company. You could suddenly be catapulted from “Jill in Accounting” to “Jill in Accounting Who Wore the Cool Vintage Dress.” You’d have more swagger. The day-to-day stress would roll off your satin-puffed shoulders. Here are some regency-era, historical-romance inspired clothing items that you should wear or bring to work “ASAP.”

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Any man who wears a tailcoat and accompanying waistcoat will look like a leader. It’s even better if you stick one hand inside the jacket, Napoleon-style. Very distinguished.

This small circular-shaped piece of glass can be held over the eye, and is ideal for peering at objects–or even people. If someone in the meeting says something that doesn’t make sense, the quizzing glass will aptly convey your need for clarity.

When a lady is bored, she should open a colorful fan, sigh heavily and cool herself. It will also be helpful during any heated discussions and moments of tension at a staff meeting.

  • A lady’s corset, a.k.a. stays

If you’re the type to feign sick, stays will help your strategy. The vice grip around your ribcage will hinder your breathing and possibly change your facial coloring. These symptoms will evoke sympathy from your colleagues and manager, who will quickly advise you to go home.

Wearing gloves will make it harder to type on a keyboard and to handle documents. They also come in handy for germaphobes.

This underskirt has the potential to balloon the lower-half of a lady’s dress to unseemly proportions. That garment, along with an authentic ballgown and the use of grand gestures, would show a commanding presence. A petticoat would also make it difficult to sit in a chair, at which time you could ask the building maintenance crew to bring in your chaise.

Though these are quite fashionable for women nowadays, riding boots on a man would be a standout. Colleagues will ask if you’ve taken up some sort of equestrian sport or bought a horse. You could answer yes to both, since either one would be impressive.

What other items should I add to this list?

 

 


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10 Things to Know About David McCullough

David McCullough is downright huggable. He’s whip-sharp with a clever wit and a memory longer than Michael Phelps’ wingspan. And he’s an incredible writer, storyteller and historian. But it’s all of that plus his affable personality and charm that make him downright huggable. There’s something about him that makes you wish he were your grandfather or uncle. If he were your next-door neighbor, you’d shovel his driveway or save his newspapers from a heavy rain. I imagine toddlers gravitating toward his knee and mouthing, “Up, up.” There’s just something about him.

20170902_102112I attended the National Book Festival on September 2 in Washington, DC, where he talked about his books and writing process. Here are 10 things to know about David McCullough.

  • About writing: “I’m not a writer, I’m a rewriter.” He mentioned how important it is to write and cut back, write and rewrite.
  • About how many pages he writes per day: “It used to be four pages per day. Now, it’s two pages per day.”dung-anh-64706
  • About how he writes: “I am proud to say that I work on a manual typewriter.” It’s by Royal, and he paid 75 bucks for it at a second-hand store. He’s written everything on it over the last 50 years. And get this: it’s never broken.
  • About women at work: “Some of the best people I worked with were women.” He briefly spoke about the challenges women face–like working harder for less pay than men.
  • About writing The Johnstown Flood: “I wrote it at night and on the weekends while working full-time.” He left his job to write The Great Bridge, the Epic Story of the Building of the Brooklyn Bridge.
  • About writing The Great Bridge: “I wanted a symbol of affirmation.” After the big success of his book Johnstown Flood, he had been approached to write about other American disasters. He turned those opportunities down, as not to be coined a bearer of bad news.
  • If he could invite a non-living president to dinner, it would be: “John Adams.”
  • About perseverance: “My favorite people are the ones who don’t give up.” He cited Harry Truman and George Washington among that group.
  • Did you know? He has 55 honorary degrees.
  • In case you were wondering, his next book is due to be published in 2019.

Any other great tidbits about the incredible David McCullough that you’d like to share?

You can read more about McCullough and other speakers from the festival at The Washington Post. Their article just won’t include words like “huggable.”

Photo by Henri Meilhac on Unsplash